3 Best Spincast Reels for New Anglers

In the world of fishing reels, there's a time and place for everything. If you're offshore chasing tuna, you need a heavy-duty round reel that's more like a truck wench than a fishing reel. If you’re hardcore bass fishing, you need a bomb-proof baitcaster with an ultra-smooth drag to launch big crankbaits and horse in an even bigger bass. But what if you're brand new to fishing and just want a reel that is easy to use right out of the box?

That's where spincast reels save the day. You know…The push button reels that have been around for decades and are found on everything from Mickey Mouse fishing poles to big catfish rods.

In this article, we will briefly review our top picks for the best spincast reels for new anglers. We'll start by getting straight tot he point and highlighting these reels; however, one of the main goals of this site is to provide you with information that will hopefully help you make your own informed decision. The information spincast reels in general can be found directly below our reviews, and hopefully this information will allow you to judge our picks and perhaps find a few different reels that could work for your specific needs as well!

3 Best Spincast Reels Available Today

If you're sold on the benefits of fishing with a spincast reel, it's time to start shopping! The problem is, however, that since spincast reels are so popular, there are an overwhelming number of different makes and models on the market. Figuring out which will last and which will crumble on the first cast can be a real challenge. But to help make your reel-buying decision process a little easier, we've rounded up what we feel are the top three spincast reels currently available.

If you go with any one of these reels and match it to a decent rod, your fishing journey will be off to a great start.

Zebco Omega ZO3PRO Spincast Reel

The name "Zebco" has been synonymous with spincast reels for the last 50 years. And while the company makes several ultra-budget friendly models, like the Zebco 202, they also make the most advance spincast reel on the market — the Zebco Omega ZO3PRO.

As the first spincast reel to feature 7 ball bearings, the Omega ZO3PRO cranks incredibly smooth. It has a triple cam multi-disc drag system that gives you fish-stopping power without all the bumpy stutters that spincast reel drag systems are known for. Regarding the reel's durability, aircraft-grade aluminum covers and an all-metal design — including the gear system — make this reel as close to bomb-proof as any modern spincast reel will get.

Sure, it's also one of the most expensive spincast reels available today, but with the Zebco Omega ZO3PRO, you get a reel that is built to last and will give you top-tier performance with every cast.

Daiwa Silvercast-A Spincast Reel

If you're looking for a high-performance spincast reel that can keep pace with most baitcast or spinning reels, check out the Daiwa Silvercast-A. While it isn't as high-tech — or expensive — as the Zebco Omega Z03PRO, the Silvercast has several noteworthy features that make it one of the best buys for the money.

First, this reel is incredibly fast, cranking in 29 inches of line per handle turn, which makes it a great option for fishing bigger lures like crankbaits and buzzbaits that require serious muscle to create the right fish-catching action. Secondly, the drag on the Silvercast is very solid and isn't likely to slip — even on the biggest, line-ripping bass.

The icing on the Silvercast's cake is an oversized line aperture that creates less resistance on the line for super long casts. Plain and simple, for under $30, the Daiwa Silvercast-A is hard to beat.

Pflueger Trion Spincast Reel

For the casual angler who might head to the pond a few times per season, the Pflueger Trion is a great spincast reel for a heck of a price. This reel gives you everything you need to cast out some bait and reel in a fish or two on a leisurely afternoon — heavy-duty metal gears, relatively smooth drag system, and a titanium pickup pins to pull in line with confidence.

In terms of the ball-bearing system, it comes with 2 ball bearings, which can be considered relatively low, but that can be expected at such an affordable price. Some anglers really like this reel for trolling, particularly when using a kayak.

The main critical comment about this reel is that the low price is generally associated with a lower durability, which can be the case for most things that are on the lower end of a price range. This doesn't necessarily mean it will break completely with minimal use, but rather, it may decline in performance over time a little faster than some other reel, eventually getting to the point where you may need a new one. This reel is cheap enough that it's probably not worth getting fixed, but instead just getting a new one.

Overall, this is a great reel for true beginners, as it will allow you to get a feel for the reel and is still decent quality for the price. Once it craps out, you can progress to a higher performance reel, or even upgrade before it craps out and use the Trion as a spare. 

Why Use a Spincast Reel?

While there certainly are some drawbacks to spincast reels — under-powered drag systems, line twist issues, and lack of durability — their pros easily outweigh their cons for novice anglers.

First, spincast reels are incredibly easy to cast. Simply push the button and hold it as you bring the rod back, then let it go as you whip the rod forward. Your lure or bait will fly toward your target and line will peel off the spool. As soon as the lure hits the water, rotate the handle and the reel will engage.

Compared to the more involved procedures involved in casting spinning or baitcast reels, spincast reels allow you to spend more time fishing and less time worrying about your next cast. 

Spincast reels are also well-suited for light-line fishing for smaller species like trout and panfish. Since line shoots off the spool so easily, spincast reels are perfect for throwing the dainty lures and baits needed to catch these smaller fish.

Thumb Push Button Reel or Finger Trigger Spincast Reel?

Once you've decided that a spincast reel is right for you, next you need to figure out which style of spincast reel you want. There are two main styles of spincast reels on the market.

Thumb Button Spincast :- 

The most common and widely used style of spincast reel. The reel is mounted on the top of the fishing rod and casts are made by pressing the button with the thumb. It's a classic, time-tested design.

Finger Trigger Spincast :- 

Also known as "underspin" reels, these reels are more similar to standard spinning reels in that they're mounted on the bottom of the fishing rod so that the reel hangs down when fishing. Instead of a push-button, a trigger positioned on the underside of the reel is used to perform a cast.

So Which One Do You Choose?

In terms of casting and fish-fighting performance, both push button and finger trigger spincast reels are nearly identical in function. The real difference is how they feel in your hand which is largely a matter of personal preference.

You'll often find finger trigger spincast reels as part of rod and reel combos made specifically for panfish. Positioning the reel on the bottom of the rod-like a spinning reel creates a more ergonomic design which can lead to reduced fatigue during long days of fishing. However, most thumb button spin cast reels on the market are relatively light, so holding them isn't very taxing.

It's hard to say which is a better design, so if possible, try out both to see which style works best for you.

Keep Things Simple With a Spincast Reel

When you're just getting started in the great pastime of fishing, don't overthink it — pick up a quality spincast reel, some bait, and head to the water. As you grow in your fishing knowledge and experience, you may feel compelled to graduate from the tried-and-true spincast reel, but until that time comes, enjoy your time on the bank and focus your efforts on catching fish.

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